Tuesday, 4 August 2009

De- or Re- territorialisation?


Thanks to Infinite - you decide which
One day I may even read past the first fifteen pages... I really meant to read the section on Savages, Nomads, Barbarians.

7 comments:

roger said...

You should - that is, read the chapter on savages, barbarians and civilises. One of the great essays on universal history. Has to be read with the Grundrisse, and vice versa. Just avoid the temptation to use D and G's vocabulary, an adhoc and insurrectionary thing that was, I think, supposed to provoke a flowerinng of other vocabularies, instead of the dismal mimicry that ensued. Put it in your own words.

Benjamin said...

You've hit the exact point as to why I should - now do I use my Minnesota press edition or invest in the new penguin in a bid to bribe my super-ego that I'm reading a new book?

roger said...

Whichever is prettiest, of course.

Anthony Paul Smith said...

I have to say, and I hope this doesn't make me a pathetic fanboy, I was really excited to see Penguin publish it. Though I wish they hadn't simply republished the old Minnesota version and re-typeset it.

Benjamin said...

Yes I was (rashly) hoping it would be a new translation or come with a new introduction. It looks great, and I'm furthest from a fan of D&G...

marcegoodman said...

Astonishing as it may seem now, Anti-Oedipus was originally published by Viking Press in the US in 1977. (I remember how strange it was to lay eyes on the Viking name on the spine of the only copy I've ever seen.) Minnesota reprinted this edition - as is, as near as I can tell - in 1983. Viking Press is now owned by Penguin, so, I suppose, "De- and Re- territorialisation."

Benjamin said...

I didn't know that. Penguin/Viking had the Foucault stuff as well. I suppose there was a missed opportunity for Penguin/Viking to become something like Gallimard or Seuil, then I could have another publisher turning down my proposals today...